Courses

Students admitted to the program must enroll in two (2) courses during Session IV, earning up to seven (7) units of credit. Students may select courses from a variety of disciplines listed below.

Course offerings are subject to availability and change.


Featured: Summer Engineering 

Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Circuits
E35 230, 3 units
MTW, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Lab A: Th, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
7/17/17 - 8/17/17
 
Electron and ion motion, electrical current and voltage.  Electrical energy, current, voltage, and circuit elements. Resistors, Ohm's Law, power and energy, magnetic fields and dc motors. Circuit analysis and Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws.  Thevenin and Norton transformations and the superposition theorem. Measuring current, voltage, and power using ammeters and voltmeters.  Energy and maximum electrical power transfer. Computer simulations of circuits.  Reactive circuits, inductors, capacitors, mutual inductance, electrical transformers, energy storage, and energy conservation. RL, RC and RLC circuit transient responses, biological cell action potentials due to Na and K ions.  AC circuits, complex impedance, RMS current and voltage.  Electrical signal amplifiers and basic operational amplifier circuits.  Inverting, non-inverting, and difference amplifiers. Voltage gain, current gain, input impedance, and output impedance. Weekly laboratory exercises related to the lectures are an essential part of the course. Prerequisite: Phys 118A. Corequisite: Math 217.
 
Probability and Statistics for Engineering
E35 326, 3 units
MTWTh, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
7/22/16 - 8/14/16
 

Study of probability and statistics together with engineering applications.  Probability and statistics: random variables, distribution functions, density functions, expectations, means, variances, combinatorial probability, geometric probability, normal random variables, joint distribution, independence, correlation, conditional probability, Bayes theorem, the law of large numbers, the central limit theorem.  Applications: reliability, quality control, acceptance sampling, linear regression, design and analysis of experiments, estimation, hypothesis testing.  Examples are taken from engineering applications. Prerequisite: Math 233 or equivalent.

Nanotechnology Concepts and Applications
E37 463, 3 units
TWTh, 5:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
7/18/17 - 8/3/17
 

The aim of this course is to introduce to students the general meaning, terminology and ideas behind nanotehnology and its potential application in various industries. The topics covered will include nanoparticles - properties, synthesis and applications, carbon nanotubes - properties, synthesis and applications, ordered and disordered nanostructured materials and their applications, quantum wells, wires and dots, catalysis and self-assembly, polymers and biological materials, nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, nanomanufacturing and functional nano-devices, health effects and nanotoxicity etc. Prerequisite: Must have knowledge in general physics, chemistry, and/or biology.

Data Structures and Algorithms
E81 247, 3 units
MWF, 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
7/17/17 - 8/17/17
 

Study of fundamental algorithms, data structures, and their effective use in a variety of applications. Emphasizes importance of data structure choice and implementation for obtaining the most efficient algorithm for solving a given problem. A key component of this course is worst-case asymptotic analysis, which provides a quick and simple method for determining the scalability and effectiveness of an algorithm.  Prerequisite: CSE 240

Object-Oriented Software Development Laboratory
E81 332S, 3 units
TThF, 5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
7/17/17 - 8/17/17
 
Intensive focus on practical aspects of designing, implementing and debugging software, using object-oriented, procedural, and generic programming techniques. The course emphasizes familiarity and proficiency with a wide range of C++ language features through hands-on practice completing studio exercises and lab assignments, supplemented with readings and summary presentations for each session. Prerequisite: CSE 247

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES

American Politics
L98 101B, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 
This course is meant to introduce students to the study of American Politics. We will analyze the origins, developments, actors, institutions, and processes of the American political system. In addition to the three branches of government, we will also cover topics such as public opinion, the media, campaigns and elections, political parties, civil right and liberties, and more.
 
Social Problems and Social Issues
L98 120, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

Through a sociological lens, this course examines the causes and consequences of  pressing social problems in America, including drug abuse, crime, poverty, racism and sexism,  the health care crisis, globalization and inequality, and environmental degradation.  Interventions guided by sociology and other social sciences  will be offered. This course will be of special interest to those with career goals in medicine and health care, social service, law,  and public policy. 

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ANTHROPOLOGY

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
L48 160B, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 p.m.
 

This course covers the basic concepts and theoretical principles of sociocultural anthropology. Course material is presented from Asia, Africa, Melanesia, Latin America, and North America.

Introduction to Archaeology
L48 190B, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Archaeology plays a critical and unique role in understanding the human past.  Through study of the methods and theories of archaeology, and a survey of important firsts in the human past, this course introduces students to the way archaeologists use material culture to reconstruct and understand human behavior.  Chronologically-ordered case studies from around the globe are used to look at social, ecological, and cultural issues facing humans from the earliest times to the present.  Students gain practice reconstructing the past through hands-on participation in two 1-hour labs focusing on lithics and animal bones.

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ARCHAEOLOGY

Introduction to Archaeology
L52 190B, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Archaeology plays a critical and unique role in understanding the human past. Through study of the methods and theories of archaeology, and a survey of important firsts in the human past, this course introduces students to the way archaeologists use material culture to reconstruct and understand human behavior. Chronologically-ordered case studies from around the globe are used to look at social, ecological, and cultural issues facing humans from the earliest times to the present. Students gain practice reconstructing the past through hands-on participation in two 1-hour labs focusing on lithics and animal bones.

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ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY

Introduction to Asian Art
L01 111, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Beginning with the birth of the Buddha and continuing through the present, this course introduces the most influential art and architecture from all across Asia. No prerequisite.

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BIOLOGY AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 

Introduction to Problem-Based Learning in Biology
L41 112, 3 units
MWF, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Have you ever wondered how doctors and scientists diagnose and discover cures to modern human afflictions? In this course, students will be given a general topic and break up into small groups to research questions related to that topic. We will all report back to the group each week with what we've found, and provide each other with interesting facts about our topic, as well as hints for conducting inquiry-based research. The instructor will guide students on how to conduct in-depth research on problems of current biological importance using a variety of web-based search engines and library tools, with a strong emphasis on learning how to read and interpret primary research articles. Weekly topics from previous years have included psychological disorders, genetics of sleep regulation, reproductive therapies, alternative medicine, and human evolution. Students should have broad interests and background in general biology and chemistry and should be curious, exploratory, interactive, and willing to try an active, nontraditional educational experience. There are no exams, so grades will be based on class participation, weekly group presentations, written outlines, and a final paper on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: High school biology, preferably an Honors or AP course.  

Principles of Biology II
L41 2970, 4 units
MWF, 1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Lab A: MWF, 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Lab B: MWF, 9:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

A broad overview of genetics, including Mendelian assortment, linkage, chromosomal aberrations, variations in chromosome number, mutation, developmental genetics, quantitative genetics, population genetics, mechanisms of evolution, and phylogenetics. Three lectures and one laboratory period each week. Exam dates TBA, from 6:30p - 8:30p. Prerequisite:  Principles of Biology I, or permission of instructor.

Synaptic Function and Plasticity in the Nervous System
U29 485, 3 units
MWF, 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Designed for students who have had a previous class in neuroscience, we will discuss synapses, and how they are modified by experience in development, learning, and memory. Using a combination of lecture and discussion, we will begin with a review of what synapses are, how they function, and how different types of synapses impact neural function. From there, we will analyze how the ability to change synaptic strength and organization as a result of experience is a fundamental characteristic of nervous system function. We will discuss activity-dependent synaptic organization during nervous system development, evidence linking synaptic plasticity to learning and memory in organisms ranging from Aplysia Californica to humans. We will discuss circuitry and mechanisms of explicit and implicit memory formation, and synaptic organization and function in aging.  We will discuss how learning and memory are altered in mood disorders and addiction, as well as how they are affected by sleep and exercise. The course will emphasize analysis of scientific evidence as well as core content. This will involve consistent inclusion of research papers and review articles into class discussion, and a 3-5 page paper that students will write on a question not directly covered in class. As the course will involve in class discussion and work as well as lecture, attendance and participation are important.

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BUSINESS 

Design Thinking: Human-Centered Approaches to Making the World
U19 290, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

***THIS COURSE IS AT MAXIMUM CAPACITY***

This course provides an overview of approaches to design thinking: a process of identifying, creating, and implementing solutions. Through an experiential approach, students learn methods for understanding user's needs, synthesizing complex information, identifying directives for design, generating ideas, prototyping, and communicating solutions. Methodologies will reflect multiple areas, including design, engineering, business, and anthropology. The class operates collaboratively tackling a locally relevant problem, such as active transportation or waste management. Students also explore the role of this process in business, organizations promoting social change, and education through readings, case studies, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and written exercises.  No prerequisite.


CHEMISTRY 

Topics in General Chemistry
L07 102, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 
Virtually any process can be understood with a strong knowledge of chemistry. This course will allow students to better understand and explain their world and is designed to prepare students for higher-level studies in chemistry. General chemistry topics studied will include: quantum chemistry and electronic structure of atoms, the nature of chemical bonding including introductory organic chemistry, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, gases, solutions, and equilibrium. The solving of multi-faceted chemical problems is central to this course. Real-world applications will be integrated often. Successful completion of this course will allow students to more easily assimilate into a General Chemistry course.
 
General Chemistry II
L07 112A, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Lab L07 152 41: TT, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Lab L07 152 A: MWF, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
 
Continuation of Chem 111A that covers chemical equilibria, ionic equilibria, galvanic cells, chemical potential, and the Laws of Thermodynamics. The laboratory includes topics and experiments from material covered in the Chem 112A lecture course. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I.
 
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
L07 262, 4 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Lab A & B: TT, 12:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Lab C: MW, 12:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
 
A course covering certain areas of organic chemistry in more detail than the prerequisite course, with special emphasis on the mechanisms and the synthetic applications of organic reactions and on the organic chemistry of biological compounds. The laboratory includes organic synthesis and spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I.
 

DANCE

American Roots of Contemporary Dance
U31 309, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

This course is an introduction to contemporary modern dance, with a particular focus on its American roots. Students will both develop various techniques and learn concepts used by American modern dance pioneers. Elements of improvisation and basic dance composition skills also be explored. Topics include the aesthetics and history of American modern dance as well as how the roots of American modern dance continue to influence contemporary dance of the 21st century. No prerequisite.

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DRAMA

Improvisation for the Actor
L15 233, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of improvisation.  Students are provided with the tools and techniques to develop their artistic voice, both individually and within an ensemble, through various theatre games, exercises, and techniques.  Students will build self-confidence, develop creativity, hone presentation skills, and have fun through working collaboratively in an ensemble. Both actors and non-actors are encouraged to take this class.
 

EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES 

Introduction to Global Climate Change in the 21st Century
L19 111, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 
Global climate and global climate change and their impacts on life and civilization. Integrated view of global climate and the diverse forces that can alter global climate. Historical and potential future consequences of global climate change on human life, our industrial civilization, and its sustainability.
 

ECONOMICS 

Introduction to Microeconomics
L11 1011, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 
Determination of prices; distribution of national income; theory of production. For a thorough introduction to economics, Economics 1021 also should be taken.
 
Introduction to Macroeconomics
L11 1021, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 
Business fluctuations: inflation, recession; monetary and fiscal policy; economic development. For a thorough introduction to economics, Economics 1011 should also be taken.
 
Game Theory and its Business Applications
L11 367, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 
This course provides an introduction to game theory and its business applications. Students will learn fundamental game theory concepts, including (but not limited to): Nash equilibrium, the outcome of sequential- and repeated-move games, and the role of signaling. Students will also be exposed to how game theory can be applied to a wide variety of business decisions, including those involving pricing, inventory management, contracting, and advertising. The ultimate goal of this course is to enhance students' rational and game-theoretic decision-making skills in real life situations. Prerequisites: High-school mathematics, Econ 1011 (Introduction to Microeconomics) or the equivalent.
 
Environmental Policy
L11  451, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 
Course will examine the relationship between environmental economics and environmental policy.  The course will focus on air pollution, water pollution, and hazardous wastes, with some attention given to biodiversity and global climate change.  The course will examine critically two prescriptions that economics usually endorses: (1) "balancing" of benefits against costs (e.g., benefit-cost analysis) and the use of risk analysis in evaluating policy alternatives; (2) use of market incentives (e.g., prices, taxes, or charges) or "property rights" instead of traditional command-and-control regulations to implement environmental policy. Prerequisite: Econ 1011 (Introduction to Microeconomics).
 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

Principles of Writing
U11 101, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

This course is about reading well and writing deliberately and sees those two acts as intimately related. Students will read as writers, studying the strategies that writers use to write persuasively, and practicing those strategies in their own writing. The course offers a method for close reading (based on finding meaningful patterns); it offers practice linking claims with evidence for those claims and it offers practice organizing papers using such skills as well-written summaries, theses, transitions, topic sentences, and paragraphs.


ENGLISH LITERATURE

Funny Page: From Comics to Graphic Novels
L14 246, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Over the last twenty years graphic narrative has begun to be theorized as its own literary medium that combines sequential images with words to tell compelling stories, both fictional and nonfictional. In this course we will study the evolution of sequential art as it developed from comic strips into comic books, and, most recently, into graphic novels. Once reviled as pulp fiction, comics have received serious critical attention since the late 1980s and are finally recognized as both literature and a new medium. In our class discussions we will approach new ways of reading for this new medium. Through class discussions, close readings, and attention to the medium's shifting aesthetic sensibilities, this course offers students an understanding of the genesis of this nascent art form. Readings: "Krazy Kat, The Spirit," Will Eisner; "Watchmen," Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons; "The Dark Knight Returns," Frank Miller; "Understanding Comics," Scott McCloud; "Maus," Art Spiegelman; "Palestine," Joe Sacco; "Ghost World," Daniel Clowes; "Fun Home," Alison Bechdel; "Persepolis," Marjane Satrapi; "Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth," Chris Ware.


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Environmental Policy
L82 451, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

Course will examine the relationship between environmental economics and environmental policy. The course will focus on air pollution, water pollution, and hazardous wastes, with some attention given to biodiversity and global climate change. The course will examine critically two prescriptions that economics usually endorses: (1) "balancing" of benefits against costs (e.g., benefit-cost analysis) and the use of risk analysis in evaluating policy alternatives; (2) use of market incentives (e.g., prices, taxes, or charges) or "property rights" instead of traditional command-and-control regulations to implement environmental policy. Prerequisite: Econ 1011 (Introduction to Microeconomics).


HISTORY

Southeast Asia in Global History: 1500 to Present
L22 100, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

This introductory survey course traces the formation of Southeast Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Students will closely examine how political, social and religious ideologies developed in different parts of Southeast Asia, including the nation-states of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand. The course traces the conceptualization of Southeast Asia as a region, examines political configurations, trade connections, religious division, and kinship structures in both continental and insular Southeast Asia, and discusses the Indian, Islamic, and Chinese influence in the region. It will further explore the wide-ranging impact of European colonialism and competition and conflict among the western European powers, Japanese expansion, and American involvement during and after WWII. The course concludes with an examination of nascent nation-states in the postwar period.

History of Western Medicine
L22 1978, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

The medical revolution is one of the greatest events in human history. Like the agrarian and industrial revolutions before it, the medical revolution resulted in the exponential growth of human population and society. This course will introduce students to the history of Western medicine from the Hippocratic Oath to the Affordable Care Act. Special attention will focus on major problems in American medicine. Within this context, students will explore concepts related the responsibility of medical practitioners, the understanding of healing and suffering, surgery and the role of anesthesia, the study of human anatomy, improved diagnostic techniques, cells and microbiology, public health and the role of the state, treatment related to gender, and the “magic bullets” of the twentieth century. This course will involve both lectures and focused class discussions.

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INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES

International Public Affairs
L97 103B, 3 units
M-F 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

We live in a complex, fast-paced world. Technological advances and economic interdependence bring us closer together, even as globalization creates new challenges that cannot be solved by one country alone. In this class you will examine the forces that affect competition and cooperation in a globalized world. Students will engage with influential social science theories to understand how public policy can help address these challenges. You will explore these theories through reading, discussion, and classroom simulations that allow you to put the theories into practice. In addition, students will work on a policy project to develop the leadership skills that are crucial for effective analysis, planning, team building, and communication in public affairs.

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JOURNALISM

Photojournalism
U49 330, 3 units
M-F 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

This course introduces students to the tools, techniques, and concepts of visual journalism; the mechanics of photography and its uses as a language of communication. Students develop an awareness of photography and a point of view through shooting assignments. The benchmark for success is understanding concepts, not photographic expertise. No darkroom work. Access to a digital or film camera and a flash is required. No disposable cameras.

Curating the City
U49 354, 3 units
M-F 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 
Students delve into five major themes that give them a deeper knowledge of the American city and prepare them to create projects ranging from blog posts to documentaries that share their knowledge with larger audiences. Students study the development of cities, with a special focus on St. Louis. They explore the city, learning how to see cities differently – as sites of study and ways of understanding the larger world rather than just as places to live and work. Students research the city, learning how primary sources and material culture can help them better understand and explain the city. Students narrate the city, gaining tips on how to write about the city in a way that makes their insights interesting and accessible to larger audiences. Finally, students present the city, proposing a project – an exhibit, a documentary, a mobile tour, or some other medium – that engages diverse audiences about the history of the American city. Taught by the Director of Exhibitions & Research at the Missouri History Museum, students leave the class with a better understanding of the American city and with the skills needed to present that understanding to the general public.
 

LEGAL STUDIES

Logic and Critical Analysis
L30 100G, 3 units
M-F 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 
Introduction to the elementary tools of logic required for constructing and critically evaluating arguments and the claims they support. Topics include: the nature of an argument; argument structure; how arguments can fail both in structure and in content; formal and informal fallacies; propositional logic and predicate calculus; and critical analysis of rhetorical strategies for presenting arguments. Students will be encouraged to develop critical reasoning skills that can be widely applied.
 
Biomedical Ethics
L30 233F, 3 units
M-F 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 
A critical examination, in light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. May include euthanasia, genetic engineering, abortion, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.
 

LINGUISTICS

Introduction to Linguistics
L44 170D, 3 units
M-F 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

Language is one of the fundamental capacities of the human species, and there are many interesting and meaningful ways in which it can be studied.  This course explores the core components of linguistic theory: speech sounds (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics).  It also provides an overview of interdisciplinary ideas and research on how language is acquired and processed, its relation to the mind-brain and to society, and the question of whether the essential properties of language can be replicated outside the human mind (specifically, in chimpanzees or computer programs).

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MATHEMATICS 

Introduction to Statistics
L24 1011, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 

Data collection: sampling and designing experiments. Data organization: data, tables, graphs, frequency distributions, numerical summarization of data, and consumer price index. Inference: elementary probability and hypothesis testing.   No Prerequisite.

Differential Equations
L24 217, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

Introduction to ordinary differential equations: first-order equations, linear equations, systems of equations, series solutions, and Laplace transform methods. Computer-aided study of numerical solutions and graphics phase planes. Prerequisite: Calculus III.

Finite Mathematics: Number Theory, Combinatorics, and Graphs

L24 220, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Introduction to number theory, combinatorics, graph theory, and their applications. Methods of proof and practical applications: calendars, scheduling, communications, encryption, etc. (Addressed mainly to college freshmen and sophomores; it would also be suitable to advanced high school students with an interest in mathematics.) Prerequisite: Arithmetic and high school algebra.  No knowledge of calculus, trigonometry, or geometry is required.

Elementary Probability and Statistics

L24 2200, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

An introduction to probability and statistics.  Discrete and continuous random variables, mean and variance, hypothesis testing and confidence limits, nonparametric methods, Student's t distribution, analysis of variance, regression, and contingency tables.  Graphing calculator with statistical distribution functions (such as the TI-83) may be required. Prerequisite: Calculus I

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MUSIC

Introduction to Music II
L27 102, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

This course explores Western music from the time of Beethoven to works by today's composers. It covers music for piano, chamber music, symphonies and works for orchestra, vocal music and opera, and music for dance. Among the 19th-century composers studied are Mendelssohn, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Brahms and Mahler. The discussion of 20th-century music includes works by Debussy, Stravinsky, Aaron Copland, George Gershwin, and Leonard Bernstein, along with music of contemporary composers Philip Glass and John Adams. The class will attend live orchestra concerts on campus. No previous musical experience is required for this course.   No previous musical experience is needed for this course.


PHILOSOPHY 

Logic and Critical Analysis
L30 100G, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Intro to the elementary tools of logic required for constructing and critically evaluating arguments and the claims they support. Topics include: the nature of an argument; argument structure; how arguments can fail both in structure and in content; formal and informal fallacies; propositional logic and predicate calculus; and critical analysis of rhetorical strategies for presenting arguments. Students will be encouraged to develop critical reasoning skills that can be widely applied.

Great Philosophers
L30 125C, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

In this course we focus on some of the most important texts in the history of Western philosophy in order to discuss a wide range of central philosophical problems. We typically consider, for example, the existence of God, the justification of claims to knowledge, and the requirements of a good human life, including the demands of morality.  Among the philosophers most likely to be studied are Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Marx, Nietzsche, and Wittgenstein.  Our goal is not just to appreciate the genius of some great philosophers but also to grapple with the current philosophical problems they have bequeathed to us.

Biomedical Ethics
L30 233F, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

A critical examination, in light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. May include euthanasia, genetic engineering, abortion, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.

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PHILOSOPHY-NEUROSCIENCE-PSYCHOLOGY (PNP)

Introduction to Social Psychology
L64 3151, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Intro to the scientific study of individual behavior in a social context. Topics: person perception, stereotyping and prejudice, attitudes, memory, and political psychology, among other issues. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.


POLITICAL ECONOMY

Topics in Politics
L50 3103, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 

This course will introduce you to basic topics in American constitutional law along with the basic research programs political scientists are engaged in when studying the judiciary. In particular, we will pay attention to how judges make decisions. We will begin by looking at the structure of American government as it is set forth in the U.S. Constitution, paying particular attention to issues of federalism and the separation of powers. We will examine the specific powers delegated by the Constitution to each branch of the federal government, e.g. the power to regulate trade and the economy, as well as state governments. Then through an examination of case law, we will observe how the structure of government has evolved over the last 200 years. Finally, we will ask whether an 18th-century constitution--one with strong counter-majoritarian features--is adequate in the 21st century.

Enviornmental Policy
L50 451, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

Course will examine the relationship between environmental economics and environmental policy. The course will focus on air pollution, water pollution, and hazardous wastes, with some attention given to biodiversity and global climate change. The course will examine critically two prescriptions that economics usually endorses: (1) "balancing" of benefits against costs (e.g., benefit-cost analysis) and the use of risk analysis in evaluating policy alternatives; (2) use of market incentives (e.g., prices, taxes, or charges) or "property rights" instead of traditional command-and-control regulations to implement environmental policy. Prerequisite: Econ 1011 (Introduction to Microeconomics).


POLITICAL SCIENCE

American Politics
L32 101B, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 
This course is meant to introduce students to the study of American Politics. We will analyze the origins, developments, actors, institutions, and processes of the American political system. In addition to the three branches of government, we will also cover topics such as public opinion, the media, campaigns and elections, political parties, civil right and liberties, and more. By the end of the class, students should become more careful and insightful consumers of political knowledge.
 
Topics in Politics: American Constitutionalism and the Law
L32 3103, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 

This course will introduce you to basic topics in American constitutional law along with the basic research programs political scientists are engaged in when studying the judiciary. In particular, we will pay attention to how judges make decisions. We will begin by looking at the structure of American government as it is set forth in the U.S. Constitution, paying particular attention to issues of federalism and the separation of powers. We will examine the specific powers delegated by the Constitution to each branch of the federal government, e.g. the power to regulate trade and the economy, as well as state governments. Then through an examination of case law, we will observe how the structure of government has evolved over the last 200 years. Finally, we will ask whether an 18th-century constitution--one with strong counter-majoritarian features--is adequate in the 21st century.

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PRAXIS

Entrepreneurship and the Liberal Arts
L62 286, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

It is a little known truth that more entrepreneurs come out of the Arts & Sciences than any other college.  This course will begin by exploring why this is so, examining in particular the creative and innovative qualities developed in liberal arts that are crucial to the success of the entrepreneur.  We will then move on to examine entrepreneurs in action, hearing from those in the field and reading of others, learning how the liberal arts proved instrumental in various ways to their development and ultimate success as entrepreneurs.

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PSYCHOLOGY

Introduction to Psychology
L33 100B, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Survey and analysis of concepts, research, and theory covering the areas of learning, memory, motivation, personality, social, abnormal, clinical, and biological psychology. Introduces the diversity of questions, areas, approaches, research, and theories that compose the study of mind and behavior.

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SUSTAINABILITY

Design Thinking: Human-Centered Approaches to Making the World
U19 290, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

This course provides an overview of approaches to design thinking: a process of identifying, creating, and implementing solutions. Through an experiential approach, students learn methods for understanding user's needs, synthesizing complex information, identifying directives for design, generating ideas, prototyping, and communicating solutions. Methodologies will reflect multiple areas, including design, engineering, business, and anthropology. The class operates collaboratively tackling a locally relevant problem, such as active transportation or waste management. Students also explore the role of this process in business, organizations promoting social change, and education through readings, case studies, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and written exercises.  No prerequisite.


WRITING

Rhetoric and Power
L13 212, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts, is perhaps more relevant today, in a world where diverse opinions reverberate 24/7 from television and the internet, than in ancient times when rhetors invented arguments to help people choose the best course of action when they disagreed about important political, religious, or social issues.  How do we make our voices heard?  How can we invent and present compelling written discourse. This course will introduce students to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and compositional studies.  Assignments in this class include rhetorical exercise in invention and craft, imitations, and varied compositions, ranging from the personal to critical, from the biographical to argumentative.  We will examine rhetorical principles (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) that are employed, for example, not only in literary analysis but in law, politics, education, and science.  We will aim for a mastery of craft and a refinement of thought.  No prerequisite.

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Prerequisite Information for Engineering Courses

The below courses are not offered for the summer program. The information is to assist students with determining their eligibility to enroll in Data Structures and Algorithms (E81 247) or Object-Oriented Software Development Laboratory (E81 332S).

Logic and Discrete Mathematics
E81 CSE 240
 
Introduces elements of logic and discrete mathematics that allow reasoning about computational structures and processes. Generally, the areas of discrete structures, proof techniques, probability and computational models are covered. Topics typically include propositional and predicate logic; sets, relations, functions and graphs; proof by contradiction, induction and reduction; finite state machines and regular languages; and introduction to discrete probability, expected value and variance.
 
Data Structures and Algorithms
E81 CSE 247
 
Study of fundamental algorithms, data structures, and their effective use in a variety of applications. Emphasizes importance of data structure choice and implementation for obtaining the most efficient algorithm for solving a given problem. A key component of this course is worst-case asymptotic analysis, which provides a quick and simple method for determining the scalability and effectiveness of an algorithm.

"This program is a great chance to learn more about American education. It convinced me to finish my master's degree in the US."

Zuoming Dai
2014 Program Participant