Chelsey Carter

Chelsey Carter

Anthropology and Public Health
Inducted in 2019

Chelsey Carter is a Ph.D. candidate in anthropology and master’s in public health candidate at Washington University in St. Louis. Chelsey‘s research interests include race, anti-black racism, gender, incurable illness, disability, embodiment, and narrative medicine in the United States. Her current research examines how illness experiences of people with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or “Lou Gehrig’s” disease) are mediated by productions of ALS knowledge especially in relation to race, class and gender. For her work on ALS, Chelsey has been recognized as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Fellow and a Mrs. and Mrs. Spencer & Ann W. Olin Fellow for Women in Graduate Study. Before graduate school, she received her Bachelor’s in Anthropology with high honors with a minor in Spanish from Emory University, where she was a recipient of the Majorie Shostak Award for Excellence in Ethnographic Writing and received the Heart of Emory award. Outside of academia, Chelsey has employed her interests in medicine and health inequality at various organizations including the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the ALS Association, CARE USA, HisGrip Home Care, and Northwestern Mutual. Chelsey believes in sharing a love of anthropology and health through teaching and service. She has been an avid volunteer with the ALS Association St. Louis Regional Chapter and Hawthorne School for Girls, the first all-girls STEM school in St. Louis, MO. Ultimately, Chelsey aspires to work as an advocate for the use of ethnographic tools and methodologies, both in and out of academia, to solve many of society’s most vexing concerns.