November 26, 2017

Dietary Supplementation with (n-3) Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Does Not Affect Insulin Sensitivity in Healthy Labrador Retriever Dogs

The study examines the effectiveness of polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation in Labrador Retriever dogs

There is a genetic propensity to obesity in certain purebred dogs such as Labrador Retrievers.

Polyunsaturated fatty acids are shown to increase insulin sensitivity in human by reducing the insulin glucose ratio and increasing glucose clearance rates. So this study examines the effectiveness of polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation in Labrador Retriever dogs.

6 healthy Labrador Retrievers were studied. They were placed on a standard maintenance diets and similar exercise levels. Polyunsaturated fatty acids was supplemented in the form of marine fish oil.

Blood was collected to measure plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. Insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, insulinogenic index, glucose fractional turnover rate, and fatty acid profiles from red blood cells were calculated.

Red blood cell fatty acid profiles were affected by the supplementation. EPA and DHA concentration in membrane were increased, which was obvious because these two fatty acids were two of the contents of the supplemented diet.

Total saturated fatty acids were unchanged. None of the insulin sensitivity measured was affected. There were no significant differences in most of the area investigated. However, one dog demonstrated greatly improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, the dietary supplementation was ineffective in further improving insulin sensitivity in healthy, non-obese insulin sensitive dogs.

The lack of any significant change in insulin sensitivity may be because the dogs were already relatively insulin sensitive. Also, further studies can be conducted with larger sample size.

 

 

Original article found in: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/132/6/1709S.full?sid=b4139ca5-638e-49aa-b8bb-a7148f9a5cdb

Summarized by Yunji Baik