December 14, 2017

The Impact of Demographic, Social, and Environmental Factors on the Development of Steroid‐Responsive Meningitis‐Arteritis (SRMA) in the United Kingdom

One disease that is especially difficult to determine the origin of in Weimaraners is Steroid‐responsive meningitis‐arteritis (SRMA), an ailment potentially triggered by various reasons. The disease causes inflammations in dogs. The researchers of the study determined that potential causes of the diseases could be “time of year, vaccination, geographic location, sex, neuter status, and breed.” Researchers did not conduct any experiments with any of the dogs; however, they did look at medical reports about several dogs, most of which included Weimaraners. Sixty dogs in the study had SRMA, while one-hundred eighty dogs were the control group. The dogs were of the age of two years or less.

When dogs were brought into the hospital, there were different tests conducted to test for the symptoms of SRMA. For neck pain, dogs’ heads were moved to the sides, up, and down. If the dogs winced, they were considered to have neck pain. Dogs were considered to have Pyrexia if temperatures take were above 102.5˚F. Finally, Neutrophilic pleocytosis, a symptom dealing excess spinal fluid, was determined by cell count.

The researchers ultimately concluded that none of the reasons they thought might have caused the SRMA actually had any effect on whether or not the dogs had the disease. Only the breed of dog had any real effect on whether or not they developed the disease. Above any other dog, Weimaraners were most likely to inherit SRMA.

J.H. Rose, M. Kwiarkowska, E.R. Henderson, N. Granger, J.K. Murray and T.R. Harcourt-Brown. “The Impact of Demographic, Social, and Environmental Factors on the Development of Steroid‐Responsive Meningitis‐Arteritis (SRMA) in the United Kingdom.” Journal of Vetrinary Internal Medicine: 28 April 2014. Web.

Original Articles: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4857946/

Summary by Ford Young