Courses

Students admitted to the program must enroll in two (2) courses earning up to seven (7) units of credit. Students may select courses from a variety of disciplines listed below.

Program students may elect to enroll in a third, one credit course at no extra cost.

Course offerings are subject to availability and change.


Featured: Summer Engineering 

Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Circuits
E35 230, 4 units
MTW, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Lab A: Th, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
7/16/18 - 8/16/18
 
Electron and ion motion, electrical current and voltage.  Electrical energy, current, voltage, and circuit elements. Resistors, Ohm's Law, power and energy, magnetic fields and dc motors. Circuit analysis and Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws.  Thevenin and Norton transformations and the superposition theorem. Measuring current, voltage, and power using ammeters and voltmeters.  Energy and maximum electrical power transfer. Computer simulations of circuits.  Reactive circuits, inductors, capacitors, mutual inductance, electrical transformers, energy storage, and energy conservation. RL, RC and RLC circuit transient responses, biological cell action potentials due to Na and K ions.  AC circuits, complex impedance, RMS current and voltage.  Electrical signal amplifiers and basic operational amplifier circuits.  Inverting, non-inverting, and difference amplifiers. Voltage gain, current gain, input impedance, and output impedance. Weekly laboratory exercises related to the lectures are an essential part of the course. Prerequisite: Phys 118A. Corequisite: Math 217.
 
Probability and Statistics for Engineering
E35 326, 3 units
MTWTh, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
7/16/18 - 8/16/18
 

Study of probability and statistics together with engineering applications.  Probability and statistics: random variables, distribution functions, density functions, expectations, means, variances, combinatorial probability, geometric probability, normal random variables, joint distribution, independence, correlation, conditional probability, Bayes theorem, the law of large numbers, the central limit theorem.  Applications: reliability, quality control, acceptance sampling, linear regression, design and analysis of experiments, estimation, hypothesis testing.  Examples are taken from engineering applications. Prerequisite: Calculus III or equivalent.

Nanotechnology Concepts and Applications
E37 463, 3 units
TWTh, 5:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
7/31/18 - 8/16/18
 

The aim of this course is to introduce to students the general meaning, terminology and ideas behind nanotehnology and its potential application in various industries. The topics covered will include nanoparticles - properties, synthesis and applications, carbon nanotubes - properties, synthesis and applications, ordered and disordered nanostructured materials and their applications, quantum wells, wires and dots, catalysis and self-assembly, polymers and biological materials, nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, nanomanufacturing and functional nano-devices, health effects and nanotoxicity etc. Prerequisite: Must have knowledge in general physics, chemistry, and biology.

Object-Oriented Software Development Laboratory
E81 332S, 3 units
TThF, 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
7/16/18 - 8/16/18
 
Intensive focus on practical aspects of designing, implementing and debugging software, using object-oriented, procedural, and generic programming techniques. The course emphasizes familiarity and proficiency with a wide range of C++ language features through hands-on practice completing studio exercises and lab assignments, supplemented with readings and summary presentations for each session. Prerequisite: CSE 247.

 

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES

American Politics
L98 101B, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 p.m.
 

This course is meant to introduce students to the study of American Politics. We will analyze the origins, developments, actors, institutions, and processes of the American political system. In addition to the three branches of government, we will also cover topics such as public opinion, the media, campaigns and elections, political parties, civil right and liberties, and more. By the end of the class, students should become more careful and insightful consumers of political knowledge.

The American City
L98 276, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

The American city has multiple forms: as a place to live and work, as a measure of economic vitality, as an architectural creation, as a political setting for both the promise and peril of democracy, and as a mythic backdrop for fictive struggles of identity formation and personal liberation. This course will begin a student's exploration of American culture and politics, with St. Louis serving as field laboratory for investigations that will also present the lives of New York, Chicago, New Orleans, Philadelphia and other cities. American cities carry material evidence of the economic and political reasons that they exist, the transportation networks that shape them, the street plans that give them form, the governments that provide the public good, the people who call them home, the role of public transportation systems, the geography of racial segregation, and the histories of immigrant communities. At the same time, the role of the American city has changed significantly in the 21st century when most Americans now live in suburbs surrounding older cities. Throughout the semester, this course will analyze the material and social culture of American cities through a series of lectures, films and field trips.

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ANTHROPOLOGY

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
L48 160B, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 

This course covers the basic concepts and theoretical principles of sociocultural anthropology. Course material is presented from Asia, Africa, Melanesia, Latin America, and North America.

Medical Anthropology
L48 387, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

The comparative study of non-Western medical systems. The definitions of health and disease, the kinds of treatment and varieties of practitioners in other cultures, e.g., Navaho, India, China.

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ARCHAEOLOGY

Introduction to Archaeology
L52 190B, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Archaeology plays a critical and unique role in understanding the human past. Through study of the methods and theories of archaeology, and a survey of important firsts in the human past, this course introduces students to the way archaeologists use material culture to reconstruct and understand human behavior. Chronologically-ordered case studies from around the globe are used to look at social, ecological, and cultural issues facing humans from the earliest times to the present. Students gain practice reconstructing the past through hands-on participation in two 1-hour labs focusing on lithics and animal bones. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to think critically about how the past is presented, and why, and the importance of the past as it relates to the present and future.

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ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY

History of Western Art, Architecture, and Design
L01 113, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

A history of the visual arts, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and design, from the ancient world to the present with emphasis on the relationship of art to society and to political and cultural events. No prerequisite.

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BIOLOGY AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 

Introduction to Problem-Based Learning in Biology
L41 112, 3 units
MWF, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This course is for students who are interested in learning how scientists discover the underlying mechanisms of human diseases leading to the development of cures and therapies. In this course, students take responsibility for their own active, inquiry-based learning on biological problems that puzzle modern scientists. Instructors will the guide students in researching the issues of current biological importance using primary literature as their primary resource. Learning how to read and interpret existing research articles from scientific literature is emphasized. Topics covered in this class include cancer, neurological disorders, infectious diseases, the gut microbiome, stem cell therapy, and gene therapy. Students should have broad interests and a strong background in general biology and chemistry and should be curious, interactive, and willing to try an active, non-traditional educational experience. The students will be challenged to use their critical and creative thinking. Prerequisite: high school biology, preferably an Honors or AP course. 

Principles of Biology II
L41 2970, 4 units
MWF, 1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Lab A: MWF, 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Lab B: MWF, 9:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

A broad overview of genetics, including Mendelian assortment, linkage, chromosomal aberrations, variations in chromosome number, mutation, developmental genetics, quantitative genetics, population genetics, mechanisms of evolution, and phylogenetics. Three lectures and one laboratory period each week. Exam dates 6:30-8:30 PM on July 26, August 7, and August 16. Prerequisite: Bio 2960, or permission of instructor.

General Biochemistry
L41 451, 4 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Lab A: MWF, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
 

A study of structure-function relationships as applied to carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; intermediary metabolism of principal cellular components; and general aspects of regulation. Prerequisites: Bio 2970 and Chem 252 and permission of department. Recommended for students who have achieved grades of B or better in the prerequisites.

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BUSINESS 

Design Thinking: Human-Centered Approaches to Making the World
U44 290, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

This course provides an overview of approaches to design thinking: a process of identifying, creating, and implementing solutions. Through an experiential approach, students learn methods for understanding users' needs, synthesizing complex information, identifying directives for design, generating ideas, prototyping, and communicating solutions. Methodologies will reflect multiple areas, including design, engineering, business, and anthropology. The class operates collaboratively tackling a locally relevant problem, such as active transportation or waste management. Students also explore the role of this process in business, organizations promoting social change, and education through readings, case studies, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and written exercises. No prerequisite.

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CHEMISTRY 

Topics in General Chemistry
L07 102, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 

This course is designed to help students successfully transition from high school AP chemistry to the college level. It provides a general introduction to topics that entering freshmen typically find among the most difficult to master in a first-semester general chemistry course, including the nature and structure of the atom, quantum chemistry, and the nature of bonding. Students gain familiarity with the way in which a rigorous college chemistry course is taught and receive a realistic exposure to the nature of quizzes and exams. Problem sets, selected readings, and group problem-solving strengthen skills and facilitate learning. Prerequisites: one year of high school chemistry, 2 years of high school algebra.

General Chemistry II
L07 112A, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Lab L07 152 41: TT, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Lab L07 152 A: MWF, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
 
Continuation of Chem 111A that covers chemical equilibria, ionic equilibria, galvanic cells, chemical potential, and the Laws of Thermodynamics. The laboratory includes topics and experiments from material covered in the Chem 112A lecture course. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I.
 
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
L07 262, 4 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Lab A & B: TT, 12:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Lab C: MW, 12:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
 
A course covering certain areas of organic chemistry in more detail than the prerequisite course, with special emphasis on the mechanisms and the synthetic applications of organic reactions and on the organic chemistry of biological compounds. The laboratory includes organic synthesis and spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I.
 

COMMUNICATION

Photojournalism: Painting with Light
U48 330, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

This course introduces students to the tools, techniques, and concepts of visual journalism; the mechanics of photography and its uses as a language of communication. Students develop an awareness of photography and a point of view through shooting assignments. The benchmark for success is understanding concepts, not photographic expertise. No darkroom work. Prerequisite: Access to a digital or film camera and a flash is required. No disposable cameras.


DANCE

American Roots of Contemporary Dance
U31 309, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

This course is an introduction to contemporary modern dance, with a particular focus on its American roots. Students will both develop various techniques and learn concepts used by American modern dance pioneers. Elements of improvisation and basic dance composition skills also be explored. Topics include the aesthetics and history of American modern dance as well as how the roots of American modern dance continue to influence contemporary dance of the 21st century. No prerequisite.

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DRAMA

Hinduism in Performance
L15 140, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 
The performing arts frame actions, stories, people, experiences, and behaviors, and as such are inherently set apart from quotidian routines; similarly, religious life is guided by distinctions between the sacred and the profane, itself a type of performance. Together we will explore the intersection of performativity and Hindu religiosity, guided by the analytic categories of classical Indian aesthetic theory. We will delve into the poetic visions of the renowned Kalidasa; the communal nature of the theatrical Ramlila; the expressions of Kuchipudi and Kathakali dance; the social cohesion of bhajan and kirtan; the divine conduit of Baul gan and Syama Songit; and the modern critique of Hindu traditions in the films of Satyajit Ray, Deepa Mehta, and Aparna Sen. In developing an enriched experiential knowledge of South Asian performance as a rich facet of Hindu religious life, we will enhance our own aesthetic appreciation and expressivity.
 
Improvisation
L15 233, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of improvisation.  Students are provided with the tools and techniques to develop their artistic voice, both individually and within an ensemble, through various theatre games, exercises, and techniques.  Students will build self-confidence, develop creativity, hone presentation skills, and have fun through working collaboratively in an ensemble. Both actors and non-actors are encouraged to take this class.
 

EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES 

Introduction to Global Climate Change in the 21st Century
L19 111, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 
Global climate and global climate change and their impacts on life and civilization. Integrated view of global climate and the diverse forces that can alter global climate. Historical and potential future consequences of global climate change on human life, our industrial civilization, and its sustainability.
 

ECONOMICS 

Introduction to Microeconomics
L11 1011, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 
Determination of prices; distribution of national income; theory of production. For a thorough introduction to economics, Economics 1021 also should be taken.
 
Introduction to Macroeconomics
L11 1021, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 
Business fluctuations: inflation, recession; monetary and fiscal policy; economic development. For a thorough introduction to economics, Economics 1011 should also be taken.
 
Game Theory and Its Business Applications
L11 367, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 
This course provides an introduction to game theory and its business applications. Students will learn fundamental game theory concepts, including (but not limited to): Nash equilibrium, the outcome of sequential- and repeated-move games, and the role of signaling. Students will also be exposed to how game theory can be applied to a wide variety of business decisions, including those involving pricing, inventory management, contracting, and advertising. The ultimate goal of this course is to enhance students' rational and game-theoretic decision-making skills in real life situations. Prerequisites: High-school mathematics, Econ 1011 or the equivalent.
 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

Principles of Writing
U11 101, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

This course is about reading well and writing deliberately and sees those two acts as intimately related. Students will read as writers, studying the strategies that writers use to write persuasively, and practicing those strategies in their own writing. The course offers a method for close reading (based on finding meaningful patterns); it offers practice linking claims with evidence for those claims and it offers practice organizing papers using such skills as well-written summaries, theses, transitions, topic sentences, and paragraphs.

Exposition: Exploring Cultural Identity
U11 204, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

This class explores writing as a means of responding to significant cultural encounters (traveling abroad, reading narratives rooted in national, regional, or ethnic identity, observing local sub-cultures, etc.). The course will consider a broad range of strategies for describing such transformations of cultural identity, including those used both in the humanities and the social sciences. Coursework will include critical and creative responses to texts, events and cultures as well as various forms of ethnographic, autobiographical, and researched writing.

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ENGLISH LITERATURE

Funny Pages: From Comics to Graphic Novels
L14 246, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Over the last twenty years graphic narrative has begun to be theorized as its own literary medium that combines sequential images with words to tell compelling stories, both fictional and nonfictional. In this course we will study the evolution of sequential art as it developed from comic strips into comic books, and, most recently, into graphic novels. Once reviled as pulp fiction, comics have received serious critical attention since the late 1980s and are finally recognized as both literature and a new medium. In our class discussions we will approach new ways of reading for this new medium. Through class discussions, close readings, and attention to the medium's shifting aesthetic sensibilities, this course offers students an understanding of the genesis of this nascent art form. Readings: "Krazy Kat, The Spirit," Will Eisner; "Watchmen," Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons; "The Dark Knight Returns," Frank Miller; "Understanding Comics," Scott McCloud; "Maus," Art Spiegelman; "Palestine," Joe Sacco; "Ghost World," Daniel Clowes; "Fun Home," Alison Bechdel; "Persepolis," Marjane Satrapi; "Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth," Chris Ware.

The Great American Novel
L14 321A, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

The Great American Novel has looked very different over the course of its history. In this course, we will examine the changing nature of the American novel, considering moments from the 19th century reformers; the literary comedians and chroniclers of "local color;" the disillusioned post-war "Lost Generation;" the historians of the Great Depression; the magical realism of meta-fiction; and the increasingly ethnically, socially, and regionally diverse voices of the 20th century. Paying attention to the way formal and thematic elements of the novels develop and also speak to one other within a literary tradition we will attempt to describe the category ourselves. Texts will likely include the following: Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, J. D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, Toni Morrison's Beloved, and Philip Roth's Nemesis.

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HISTORY

The Second World War in World History
L22 164, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

This course is an introduction to World History that uses World War II as a lens to examine the methodologies, approaches and sources historians employ to understand and analyze historical periods. The class will explore the global connections and interactions which characterize World History. The emphasis of this course will be on digging into topics traditionally neglected: the impact of the war on race, gender, family and children; daily life; and daily ethical decision making.

Religion, Race, and Politics in Recent American History
L22 3513, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Religion and politics are often seen as topics best avoided in polite company. Yet matters of faith have exerted a powerful influence in American public life. For the last two decades, analysts have debated the existence of "culture wars" dividing Americans on issues of values, lifestyles, and beliefs. This course traces the relationship between American religion and politics from the Cold War through the Civil Rights Movement up to the present day. Students will study civil rights activism (and opposition) in the 1950 and 1960s and the prominence of evangelical Christianity since the 1970s. Case studies will include civil rights leaders Martin Luther King, Jr. and Fannie Lou Hamer as well as influential evangelicals Billy Graham and Marabel Morgan. This course will allow students to critique interpretations of the place of religion in American life.

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INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES

International Public Affairs
L97 103B, 3 units
M-F 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

We live in a complex, fast-paced world. Technological advances and economic interdependence bring us closer together, even as globalization creates new challenges that cannot be solved by one country alone. In this class you will examine the forces that affect competition and cooperation in a globalized world. Students will engage with influential social science theories to understand how public policy can help address these challenges. You will explore these theories through reading, discussion, and classroom simulations that allow you to put the theories into practice. In addition, students will work on a policy project to develop the leadership skills that are crucial for effective analysis, planning, team building, and communication in public affairs.

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JOURNALISM

Photojournalism: Painting with Light
U48 330, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

This course introduces students to the tools, techniques, and concepts of visual journalism; the mechanics of photography and its uses as a language of communication. Students develop an awareness of photography and a point of view through shooting assignments. The benchmark for success is understanding concepts, not photographic expertise. No darkroom work. Prerequisite: Access to a digital or film camera and a flash is required. No disposable cameras.

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LEGAL STUDIES

Introduction to Logic and Critical Analysis
L84 105G, 3 units
M-F 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 

This course is an introduction to first-order logic. Logic is the study of the formal properties of arguments. In this course we learn how to make arguments precise by formalizing sentences and applying methods of deductive reasoning to prove conclusions. We also discuss the relations between logical reasoning and informal reasoning, and logic and rationality. Why study logic? Logic gives you principles and techniques to distinguish good forms of reasoning, helps you to construct correct arguments, and (to some extent) think orderly. Additionally, logic is essential in other fields that you might also be interested in studying (e.g., mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and analytic philosophy). And of course, logic is a fun and interesting subject in its own right. The course presumes no background in philosophy or logic.

Biomedical Ethics
L84 233F, 3 units
M-F 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 
A critical examination, in light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. May include euthanasia, genetic engineering, abortion, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.
 

LINGUISTICS

Introduction to Linguistics
L44 170D, 3 units
M-F 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

Language is one of the fundamental capacities of the human species, and there are many interesting and meaningful ways in which it can be studied.  This course explores the core components of linguistic theory: speech sounds (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics).  It also provides an overview of interdisciplinary ideas and research on how language is acquired and processed, its relation to the mind-brain and to society, and the question of whether the essential properties of language can be replicated outside the human mind (specifically, in chimpanzees or computer programs).

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MATHEMATICS 

Introduction to Statistics
L24 1011, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 

Data collection: sampling and designing experiments. Data organization: data, tables, graphs, frequency distributions, numerical summarization of data, and consumer price index. Inference: elementary probability and hypothesis testing. No Prerequisite.

Differential Equations
L24 217, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

Introduction to ordinary differential equations: first-order equations, linear equations, systems of equations, series solutions, and Laplace transform methods. Computer-aided study of numerical solutions and graphics phase planes. Prerequisite: Calculus III.

Finite Mathematics: Number Theory, Combinatorics, and Graphs

L24 220, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Introduction to number theory, combinatorics, graph theory, and their applications. Methods of proof and practical applications: calendars, scheduling, communications, encryption, etc. (Addressed mainly to college freshmen and sophomores; it would also be suitable to advanced high school students with an interest in mathematics.) Prerequisite: Arithmetic and high school algebra.  No knowledge of calculus, trigonometry, or geometry is required.

Elementary Probability and Statistics

L24 2200, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

An introduction to probability and statistics.  Discrete and continuous random variables, mean and variance, hypothesis testing and confidence limits, nonparametric methods, Student's t distribution, analysis of variance, regression, and contingency tables.  Graphing calculator with statistical distribution functions (such as the TI-83) may be required. Prerequisite: Calculus I

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PHILOSOPHY 

Logic and Critical Analysis
L30 100G, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

This course is an introduction to first-order logic. Logic is the study of the formal properties of arguments. In this course we learn how to make arguments precise by formalizing sentences and applying methods of deductive reasoning to prove conclusions. We also discuss the relations between logical reasoning and informal reasoning, and logic and rationality. Why study logic? Logic gives you principles and techniques to distinguish good forms of reasoning, helps you to construct correct arguments, and (to some extent) think orderly. Additionally, logic is essential in other fields that you might also be interested in studying (e.g., mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and analytic philosophy). And of course, logic is a fun and interesting subject in its own right. The course presumes no background in philosophy or logic.

Great Philosophers
L30 125C, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

What is real beyond perception? What are the limits of human knowledge? What does it mean to act freely? What makes a person good? What makes an act right? And what ultimately matters? In this class, we will confront some of the most puzzling questions we as humans face through discussion of classic philosophical works by some of the greatest minds of all time, including Descartes, Hume, Anscombe, Aristotle, Kant, and Mill.

Biomedical Ethics
L30 233F, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

A critical examination, in light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. May include euthanasia, genetic engineering, abortion, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.

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PHILOSOPHY-NEUROSCIENCE-PSYCHOLOGY (PNP)

Cognitive Nueroscience
L64 3604, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

A general introduction to the underlying principles and mechanisms of brain function that give rise to complex human cognitive behavior. Emphasis will be placed on how emerging methods and approaches from both neuroscience and cognitive psychology have been integrated to yield new insights into the organization and structure of higher mental processes. Topics include perception, attention, memory, language, and executive control. Prerequisite: Psychology 100B.

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PHYSICS

General Physics II
L31 118A, 4 units
M-F, 9:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
F, 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Lab A: MW, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Second semester of a two-semester, calculus-based introductory physics sequence designed to expose students to the concepts, laws, and structure of physics. Topics include electromagnetic forces and fields, direct current circuits, capacitance and inductance, electromagnetic radiation, light, geometric and physical optics, interference and diffraction, early quantum theory, and nuclear physics. Five 2.75-hour lectures and two 3-hour lab sessions each week (all mandatory). Exams, at which attendance is required, will be given from 1:30-4:30 p.m. on July 20, July 27, August 3, and August 10. Previous enrollment in Calculus II or familiarity with the techniques of integral calculus is very strongly recommended.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

American Politics
L32 101B, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 p.m.
 
This course is meant to introduce students to the study of American Politics. We will analyze the origins, developments, actors, institutions, and processes of the American political system. In addition to the three branches of government, we will also cover topics such as public opinion, the media, campaigns and elections, political parties, civil right and liberties, and more. By the end of the class, students should become more careful and insightful consumers of political knowledge.
 

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PRAXIS

Entrepreneurship and the Liberal Arts
L62 286, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

It is a little known truth that more entrepreneurs come out of the Arts & Sciences than any other college.  This course will begin by exploring why this is so, examining in particular the creative and innovative qualities developed in liberal arts that are crucial to the success of the entrepreneur.  We will then move on to examine entrepreneurs in action, hearing from those in the field and reading of others, learning how the liberal arts proved instrumental in various ways to their development and ultimate success as entrepreneurs.

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PSYCHOLOGY

Introduction to Psychology
L33 100B, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Survey and analysis of concepts, research, and theory covering the areas of learning, memory, motivation, personality, social, abnormal, clinical, and biological psychology. Introduces the diversity of questions, areas, approaches, research, and theories that compose the study of mind and behavior.

Cogntive Neuroscience
L33 3604, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
 

A general introduction to the underlying principles and mechanisms of brain function that give rise to complex human cognitive behavior. Emphasis will be placed on how emerging methods and approaches from both neuroscience and cognitive psychology have been integrated to yield new insights into the organization and structure of higher mental processes. Topics include perception, attention, memory, language, and executive control. Prerequisite: Psychology 100B.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Hinduism in Performance
L23 140, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
 

The performing arts frame actions, stories, people, experiences, and behaviors, and as such are inherently set apart from quotidian routines; similarly, religious life is guided by distinctions between the sacred and the profane, itself a type of performance. Together we will explore the intersection of performativity and Hindu religiosity, guided by the analytic categories of classical Indian aesthetic theory. We will delve into the poetic visions of the renowned Kalidasa; the communal nature of the theatrical Ramlila; the expressions of Kuchipudi and Kathakali dance; the social cohesion of bhajan and kirtan; the divine conduit of Baul gan and Syama Songit; and the modern critique of Hindu traditions in the films of Satyajit Ray, Deepa Mehta, and Aparna Sen. In developing an enriched experiential knowledge of South Asian performance as a rich facet of Hindu religious life, we will enhance our own aesthetic appreciation and expressivity.

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SPANISH

Elementary Spanish Level II
L38 109, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
 

Continuation of Spanish 108. The 109 Spanish course parallels the methodology of the 108 level, but more sophisticated grammatical skills are covered. The 108-109 sequence covers the major grammatical points of the language. Students who complete Spanish 108 and 109 are eligible to enroll in Spanish 201. Prerequisite: Elementary Spanish Level I or equivalent.

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SUSTAINABILITY

The American City
U19 276, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

The American city has multiple forms: as a place to live and work, as a measure of economic vitality, as an architectural creation, as a political setting for both the promise and peril of democracy, and as a mythic backdrop for fictive struggles of identity formation and personal liberation. This course will begin a student's exploration of American culture and politics, with St. Louis serving as field laboratory for investigations that will also present the lives of New York, Chicago, New Orleans, Philadelphia and other cities. American cities carry material evidence of the economic and political reasons that they exist, the transportation networks that shape them, the street plans that give them form, the governments that provide the public good, the people who call them home, the role of public transportation systems, the geography of racial segregation, and the histories of immigrant communities. At the same time, the role of the American city has changed significantly in the 21st century when most Americans now live in suburbs surrounding older cities. Throughout the semester, this course will analyze the material and social culture of American cities through a series of lectures, films and field trips.

Design Thinking: Human-Centered Approaches to Making the World
U19 290, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

This course provides an overview of approaches to design thinking: a process of identifying, creating, and implementing solutions. Through an experiential approach, students learn methods for understanding user's needs, synthesizing complex information, identifying directives for design, generating ideas, prototyping, and communicating solutions. Methodologies will reflect multiple areas, including design, engineering, business, and anthropology. The class operates collaboratively tackling a locally relevant problem, such as active transportation or waste management. Students also explore the role of this process in business, organizations promoting social change, and education through readings, case studies, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and written exercises.  No prerequisite.

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ONE-CREDIT BONUS COURSES

Any of these three classes may be added as a seventh credit (to a two-class, or six-credit academic load) at no extra cost:

Body Conditioning
U31 104, 1 unit
M/W, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.

This course improves flexibility, alignment, muscle strength, and movement awareness through a combination of methods derived from yoga, Pilates-based work, and basic dance techniques. Includes comparison of breathing techniques in yoga and the Pilates method. Students should bring a mat and be prepared for rigorous work. Students may enroll no more than two times. No prerequisite.

Tap Dance: Beginning
U31 225, 1 unit
M/W, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.
 

Introduction to basic tap steps and rhythms. Development of awareness of varied tap dance styles. No previous dance training required. No prerequisite.

How to Listen to Popular Music
U24 1061, 1 unit
M/W, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.
 

Learn to talk and write about popular music. We will consider all kinds of popular music: American and not, from the entire history of recorded sound. Issues of technology, the music industry, genre, musical form and style, gender, sexuality, and social class will all be considered. And we'll learn to dance as well. Coursework includes listening to and reading about music, writing in various online-friendly formats, and making short videos and podcasts. No prerequisite.


Prerequisite Information for Engineering Courses

The below course is not offered for the summer program. The information is to assist students with determining their eligibility to enroll in Object-Oriented Software Development Laboratory (E81 332S).

 
Data Structures and Algorithms
E81 CSE 247
 
Study of fundamental algorithms, data structures, and their effective use in a variety of applications. Emphasizes importance of data structure choice and implementation for obtaining the most efficient algorithm for solving a given problem. A key component of this course is worst-case asymptotic analysis, which provides a quick and simple method for determining the scalability and effectiveness of an algorithm.

"This program is a great chance to learn more about American education. It convinced me to finish my master's degree in the US."

Zuoming Dai
2014 Program Participant