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July 1, 2014

Insect Diet Helped Early Humans Build Bigger Brains

Science Daily, July 1, 2014

Quest for elusive bugs spurred primate tool use, problem-solving skills

Figuring out how to survive on a lean-season diet of hard-to-reach ants, slugs and other bugs may have spurred the development of bigger brains and higher-level cognitive functions in the ancestors of humans and other primates, suggests new research.

Read the rest of the article, or the original article by Gerry Everding here.

June 1, 2014

The Melin Lab represents at FameLab

Lab members' science communication efforts are rewarded

FameLab is a one-of-a-kind competition in science communication - a three-minute chance to explain your research, however complicated, to a general audience using no slides or media, but just the power

April 30, 2013

The Technicolor Tarsier

On Earth, April 30, 2013

You could get lost gazing into the eyes of a tarsier. But these primate peepers are also providing insight into how human vision evolved.

By Melissa Mahoney

To early mammals, the world looked something like the beginning of The Wizard of Oz: colorless. But at some point, a group of primates began seeing reds, greens, and blues—and many shades of pink, yellow, and aquamarine in between. Scientists have long thought that color vision—called trichromacy—developed in primates sometime after they stopped hunting at night and began waking up with the sun.

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